Our Garden Supremo

African Coral Tree  at Cantueso a few weeks after being planted from seed

José Zapata Camacho our gardener has, in recent years, worked tirelessly bringing Cantueso’s much admired gardens up-to-date. He has replanted many flower beds and at the same time covered them with matting and gravel to minimise water evaporation. The harsh looking gravel is soon lost below the abundant flowers which are selected to give colour and groundcover throughout the year.  He is a very experienced plantsman and chooses carefully, varieties that he knows will flourish under the wide ranging temperature and wind conditions that we experience at Cantueso. He is introducing lots of interesting and rarely seen plants.

Erythrina caffra: Many of the plants are grown from seed and one of the latest is the Erythrina Caffra, the coast coral tree or African coral tree. It is a tree native to southeastern Africa, and often cultivated in other countries with warm climates, it is also the official tree of Los Angeles, California.

A spiky treat for animals

As can be seen in our photos it is curently a very small plant and the thorns on the stem are there to prevent annimals eating the growing specimens. Once grown however it has flowers of various shades of red and crimson with equally colourful seed pods.

In South Africa, Erythrina Caffra is seen as a royal tree: it is a much respected and admired in the Zulu culture and is believed to have magical properties. Specimens have been planted on the graves of many Zulu chiefs and in parts of the Eastern Cape, local inhabitants will not burn the wood for fear of attracting lightning.

The Coral Tree in bloom

The African women of South Africa make the highly decorative seeds of Erythrina caffra into necklaces. Children also love collecting them where they are known as lucky beans. All coral trees produce a poison with a paralysing action, which is used medicinally to relax the muscles in treating nervous diseases. The seeds of all erythrinas are said to be poisonous, and the leaves of Erythrina Caffra are known to have poisoned cattle. The bark of E. caffra is used topically to treat sores, wounds, abscesses and arthritis. Open wounds may be treated with powdered, burnt bark; infusions of the leaves are used as eardrops for earache; and decoctions of the roots are used for sprains. The Vhavenda use the bark for toothache. Erythrina alkaloids are known to be highly toxic, but the traditional uses strongly suggest antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects

They sound like a gowing medical kit. We will of course have to wait a few years to see the trees great beauty and although tempting, are unlikely to try a medical remedy 🙂

Cantueso in Spring

Cantueso Holiday Cottage, gardens

Cottage terrace with Bourgainvillea

Like Kids they Grow Up

In 2007 we were host to a stray dog called Maddey who had been born somewhere around Cantueso and was a real scavenger. We fed her but she remained aloof and would not permit any hand contact. And then one day we realised that she must be pregnant, and we didn’t have long to wait, as that night she gave birth to seven puppies under the staircase behind the restaurant The most surprising thing about the puppies was that they were all so different This puzzled us until our vet Mario told us that it was quite possible for a litter to have different fathers. We then recalled seeing several man friends visiting Maddey, and these included a Dalmation, Yorkshire terrier and others of mixed breeds.

The surprise arrival of Puppies at Cantueso

Our photo shows just five of the puppies but six did survive and after a struggle we found homes for them, with two going abroad one to Germany and one to Finland.  The one that went to Finland (second from the front) had been jokingly called Feo (Ugly) because she was a most odd looking, hairy dog, possibly the result of a liaison with an Afghan Hound. However she was registered as “Bonnie.”

Bonnie just before leaving Spain for her first winter in Finland

Some years ago we had heard from her new owners in Finland and knew she had gone to a good home and now this week we have had an update with this photo of “Bonnie”  11 years old and looking gorgeous.

Bonnie looking gorgeous at 11

Footnote:    After these unexpected arrivals we thought it best to have Maddey spayed and after a few comedy moments trying to catch her we succeeded and off with Mario she went in a cage. To our surprise she came home after the op in the back of Mario’s car without a cage and completely at ease. This was just before Christmas 2008 and when released Maddey went off into the countryside, no doubt checking the rubbish bins as always and maybe stealing the odd chicken! For a few weeks she came and went as normal but then one day she never returned. Sadly we have no idea what happened to her.

Summer Menu at Cantueso

Our chefs have been busy creating some new dishes and many old favourites for this summer, which we hope you will try and enjoy.

As always all our food is home made and please remember we can cope with allergies and food intolerences. Just let us know and look at our special menu which lists all the main allergens. Click below to see full details of our summer  menu.

Cantueso menu May 18

Chen Style Taijiquan

This week we were pleased to welcome back CTND from Germany for their third visit to Cantueso.

CTND Tai Chi at Cantueso

CTND hold a series of workshops throughout the week and find the tranquillity of our setting perfect for their specialist branch of Tai Chi which is an ancient Chinese system of health, martial arts, and mental conditioning.

The Chen Style Taijiquan Network in Germany was founded by Nabil Ranné and Konstantin Berberich both of whom have spent many years studying and teaching Tai Chi throughout the world.

Here in Periana they provide an intensive series of workshops teaching the first form (Yilu) in the tradition of Chen Fake, Chen Zhaokui and Chen Yu. The course is suitable for both beginners and advanced students.

The class of 2017. CTND Students come from all over Europe

Konstantin in action

Nabil leading by example

CTND also hold seminars and workshops in several locations throughout Europe and further details can be found on their website: www.ctnd.de

 

Nightingales – London’s Loss is Spain’s Gain!

Nightingale photo courtesy Yuri Timofeyaz

Nightingale                                                                                    photo courtesy Yuri Timofeyaz

We are all used to the notion that nightingales used to sing in Berkley Square, and now can add Periana as another location, as Restaurante Cantueso has played host for the last six years to a couple of songsters and hope they will appear once again this month. They can already be heard out in the countryside and a favourite spot is behind one of the town’s rubbish tips. Not the most salubrious of places but we are sure real “birders” won’t mind a bit.

These tiny birds migrate to and from Guinea-Bissau, the former Portuguese colony which is one of Africa’s smallest and least-known states. They return to Europe in April and start making their amazing music not only at night but also during the daytime too. Nesting in dense bushes alongside our restaurant terrace the male nightingale (ruiseñor in Spanish) protects his patch from intruders occupying the same song post every year.

We have been so impressed with the complicated repertoire of the bird that we are hoping to capture the sound on tape and will add to this blog as soon as we are successful. Meanwhile we have added a lovely recording here made in England.

A PS:

Today, 28th June, we heard the little beauties near Cantueso early in the morning.Maybe a late comer?

People Say the Nicest Things!

Lake Vinuela seen from the Restaurant Terrace at Cantueso in Periana

Lake Vinuela seen from the Restaurant Terrace at Cantueso in Periana

As the season has just started and with the restaurant reopened after our winter break it was nice for staff to see such lovely comments as these posted on another website.

Review #17309028 “Cantueso Rural Cottages with Mountain and Lake Views”

A  beautiful and tranquil location with a bird’s eye view of the lake & fantastic hospitality!

★ ★ ★ ★ ★

We spent three idyllic nights in one of the cottages on site. They are all arranged cleverly to take in the amazing views of Lake Vinuela. We had the most amazing view from our veranda and spent most of our time outside, by the pool or our three children would be exploring the many areas thoughtfully designed to entertain them; trampoline and crazy golf overlooking the lake, games room with table tennis, darts board, table football and a host of toys for smaller children. We adults were blown away by the standard of the tapas food that was served at lunchtime and overindulged both times we ate there. Nicky was a great host, very smiley and welcoming. The property had a rustic charm, very cool inside despite being unusually warm during our stay (27/28 degrees in April!) and well equipped with everything you’d need to cater for yourselves. It was lovely to be part of a small community of other cottages, with other families and children around. The pool was lovely with a good shallow end for smaller children but also a deep end for the children to dive into. We will definitely be back for another quiet getaway in the future. Thanks again for your hospitality!

Date of arrival 12 April 2017

A typical Cottage at Cantueso

A typical Cottage at Cantueso

Paella Time at Cantueso Cottages

During the winter months when the Cantueso restaurant is closed we offer a personal chef service to guests staying in our cottages. It enables them to have a special meal cooked and delivered to them or cooked in their cottage. We provide a suggested menu but will cook to order any Spanish speciality (within reason!).

We appreciate the family allowing us to use their photo.

We appreciate the family allowing us to use their photo.

Paella is always popular and many treat it as a master class with it being cooked in front of them so that they can see the little twists that make it so special.
Over Christmas the Ter Maat family took advantage of this service and our chef Joel Falcone cooked a Paella for them.
Joel has been with us for the last 8 years and is responsible for devising and cooking our summer menu. When we re-open in March you will be able to try the Paella too 🙂

The Festival of San Isidro Labrador

During May guests at Cantueso are able to join in the village festivities in celebration of “San Isidro” an annual event lasting several days with lots of fun for all ages.

san isidro2015San Isidro Labrador is the patron saint of Periana and once a year the inhabitants celebrate a successful harvest with a procession through the streets taking several hours and after which the parties start.

The history of the procession is said to date back to a time when a there was a poor summer with little rain and a resultant low yield harvest. The local farmers paraded the statue of St Isidro though the fields and afterwards the harvest improved and subsequently the grateful villagers were inclined to give their weight in grain every year in thanks.

Villagers Donate Grain from their balcony (photo courtesy perianaypedanias.blogspot.com)

This is the basis of the procession which today stops under any balcony in the village displaying a decorated shawl or blanket, and the householders pour sacks of wheat into the waiting carriage below. The image of St Isidro, adorned with spikes and red and white carnations is specially constructed so that grain poured from above passes through a funnel into a hopper below. This hopper holds about 500 kilos of grain and when full is put into sacks which will eventually be sold and the proceeds used to defray the cost of future celebrations.

Years ago only the rich could afford to donate wheat (never any other grain) as many families only had enough for their own families, but nowadays many villagers are pleased to take part as a thanks for their families health and prosperity.

Stewards carrying the Staute around the village (photo courtesy perianaypedanias.blogspot.com)

The procession was previously in the control of four stewards and their wives always newly married and childless. However it now usually needs ten to fifteen stewards to carry the statue and it is they who control the day’s events and work throughout the year planning and organising.

The original statue of St Isidro was destroyed along with the church in the Periana earthquake of 1884 but subsequently replaced, and during the civil war it was hidden by a quick thinking villager and so survived those troubled times.

You can see the latest view of Periana and Lake Vinuela from the live webcam at Restaurante Cantueso or go to the main web site.

This year’s programme can be seen here: http://www.periana.es/es/noticias/paginaNoticia.html?pos=1&pag=1&query=

An unwelcome visitor!

It is not often we would describe a visitor as unwelcome, but last Saturday we had a power cut that stopped our restaurant operating and left guests in our cottages without power. A great saga ensued due in the main to Endesa the electricity supplier failing massively  to give the service we pay for. We are supposed to have a 90 minute emergency call out but on Saturday, after more than 25 telephone calls they turned up after 8 hours! And then to blithely say “not our problem get someone else to fix it.”

To cut a long, long, story short we finally found a competent contractor that could help at 7.30 am the next morning. It took him 20 minutes to change a fuse (one that was as long as your arm) and we had power restored, which brings me to the nub of our story. A visiting Genet had decided to climb the pylon and electrocuted himself in the process, and this in turn took out one of the three phases.

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Gineta, Jineta or Gato Almizclero (musk cat)                    Photo copyright Steve Garvie

Genets are cat-like carnivores closely related to the mongoose and most of them have a spotted coat with long bushy tails, and whilst seldom seen they are not rare creatures, but found throughout Europe having originated in Africa and most likely been imported as pets many years ago.
Nowadays wild Genets live all over Spain and can live in olive groves by eating small animals and insects. They are nocturnal and generally live alone.

What our Genet was doing up an 80ft pylon we will never know and quite how it climbed up is puzzling as its retractable claws would presumably be of little use on steel. Not the ideal way to see our first Genet and hopefully we won’t see another in such circumstances.

 

Are You Intolerant?

New Laws on food labelling of allergens for restaurants and food providers

At Cantueso we have long been able to help people who suffer from allergies and food intolerances because fortunately we produce all our own dishes and do not rely on bought in pre-prepared products.

However new regulations from December 2014 will cause considerable work as it will mean that we have to ask all suppliers of a raw ingredient to similarly identify what is in their product. Even the wine or oil we cook with will have to be analysed for the allergens.
It is estimated that 1-2% of adults and 5-8% of children are affected. This equates to millions of people throughout Europe with a food allergy, but does not include those with food intolerances. This means the actual number of affected people living with a food allergy and/or a food intolerance is considerably higher. (Interestingly when people in the UK were asked about allergies 20% claimed to suffer!)

Nuts, one of the main culprits in food allergies

An allergic reaction can be produced by a tiny amount of a food ingredient that a person is sensitive to (for example a teaspoon of milk powder, a fragment of peanut or just one or two sesame seeds). Symptoms of an allergic reaction can range from mild symptoms such as itching around the mouth and rashes; and can progress to more severe symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhoea, wheezing and on occasion anaphylaxis (shock).

There is no cure for food allergy. The only way to manage the condition is to avoid food that makes the person ill.
When we re-open Restaurante Cantueso on the 20th March 2015 after our winter break, we will have available on request, a menu with the allergens shown and a member of staff to advise.

In the past we have helped many families who come to Cantueso with children (who it seems suffer in greater numbers than adults) and made sure we cook dishes for them that are safe to eat.
No doubt we will also have diners again who tell us they are lactose intolerant and carefully select their starter and main but when they see Carmen’s home made desserts, they look thoughtful and say “well I suppose a little won’t hurt” 🙂 !

The new laws for food businesses relating to the labelling and provision of allergen information centres around a list of the 14 most common triggers.

• Cereals containing gluten namely wheat (such as spelt and Khorasan wheat), rye, barley, and oats.
• Crustaceans and products thereof (for example prawns, lobster, crabs and crayfish)
• Eggs
• Fish and fish products
• Peanuts
• Soy beans
• Milk and milk products (including lactose).
• Nuts (namely almond, hazelnut, walnut, cashew, pecan nut, Brazil nut, pistachio nut and Macadamia nut (Queensland nut)
• Celery
• Mustard
• Sesame seeds
• Sulphur dioxide and sulphites
• Lupin seeds
• Molluscs for example: mussels, clams, oysters, scallops, snails and squid.

XII Peaches Day Festival

dia del melocoton 12On Saturday 2nd August 2014 the 12th Peaches Festival will once again be held in Periana. Unlike last year when due to economic restrictions it was held alongside the August festival, it will once again be a stand alone event.

During the day there will be the usual stalls and amusements set up along the main street with various free tastings, and a medieval market. There will also be the popular cookery competition; dishes for which should of course contain Peaches.

Later there will be an on stage Festival of Rock & Roll, with various tribute acts and then music with Dj’s until the early hours.

In previous years more than 5000 people came to the village and this year is bound to be just as lively. A stroll around the streets filled with the scent of peaches is bound to get your taste buds moving and suitable food and refreshment stalls will be available.

A little Peach History: It is thought that a resident brought the first seedling to Periana after a visit to Argentina 200 years ago and it thrived in the wonderful climate and fertile land. As the crop developed it was taken to neighbouring villages on the backs of donkeys and eventually became popular with buyers from Murcia and surrounding provinces. However it was not until the last half of the 20th century that the crop came to prominence being appreciated for its taste, aromatic scent, soft velvet skin, colour and culinary versatility and by the 70’s a good year would yield as much as 4 million kilos.

Sadly as so often happens in agriculture, the crops were affected by pests and several years of drought which led to a steady decline in production. This continued until about ten years ago when market demand encouraged growers to plant more trees and the municipality started to promote peaches once again. Hence this year is the twelth in which the village and visitors will get to party the night away.

If you have time come up and visit us at Restaurante Cantueso where Carmen our chef is sure to produce some very tempting dishes, and whatever you do, don’t forget to buy a box of these special fruits to take home before you leave.

¡Que aproveche!

Hidden Treasures near Cantueso with Geocaching

 

Dirk en Netty Eijlers at El Torcal

Dirk en Netty Eijlers at El Torcal

 

We are always pleased to see walkers staying in our cottages and through one couple this week from Holland we have learned of Geocaching. We were quite surprised that we had never heard about this walking pastime, which turns out to have millions of enthusiasts worldwide. We then learned that there are quite a few “caches” in the hills around Cantueso and that a search tends to lead walkers to special areas they would otherwise not get to see. Dirk en Netty Eijlers from Pijnacker in the Netherlands took this “selfie” at El Torcal. They made several walks from Cantueso in search of caches and succeeded in finding all but one. They also mentioned that over the last few years they have found over two hundred caches in several countries. Phew, that must have involved a lot of kilometers!

What is Geocaching?

Geocaching is a game that reveals a world beyond the everyday, where the possibility of a new discovery hides under park benches, in the forest, and probably a short walk from where you are right now. The adventure begins by searching for cleverly hidden containers called geocaches.

There are more than two million geocaches waiting to be found throughout the world, in more than 180 countries. It’s easy for anyone from families to business travelers to top tier athletes to begin the journey by downloading the Geocaching app or visiting Geocaching.com.

• Watch the 75second What is Geocaching? video to learn more.

• Learn about the History of Geocaching.

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Driving from UK to Cantueso in Periana, Spain

 

We are often asked for advice about driving to Spain and one of the main questions is whether it is better to use the Ferries or go through the Channel Tunnel and which is cheaper.

An example of our own trip to the UK last month will help to clarify some points.  Periana to Colchester is a trip of 1400 miles going through the Tunnel and 700 if using the ferry from Santander or Bilbao to Portsmouth.  Using the ferry means that you can drive to Santander from Periana in one day of hard driving, mostly motorways which are excellent and we managed the 550 miles in 9 hours plus a couple of stops.  The ferry departed the next day so a night in the town was necessary.

Not really a hardship as Santander has some excellent fish restaurants including  El Serbal a Michelin starred place that must surely be the cheapest in Europe.  Lunch menu 35€ or 8 course tasting menu with wine for each course 85€, no service charge or extras for seven sorts of bread, water, appetisers etc.  And when did you last get a glass of wine for 3.60€ apart from Cantueso J

The Brittany Ferry takes about 23 hours, with comfortable cabins and good restaurants as you would expect from a French boat.  They describe it as a cruise and certainly their flagship the Pont-aven has all the facilities you would expect on a cruise.

Depending on the day and time you travel the journey can be one night or two, and things have improved so much in recent years that even travelling with pets is possible. There are pet friendly cabins or kennels and an exercise area on deck.

So far as costs go it was on this occasion about the same as going through France where the tolls are high and of course the extra mileage means a lot more fuel and usually two nights in hotels. Much depends on how much time you have and whether you wish to make it a leisurely drive or a sprint.

We shall make the return journey in February and that will be even easier and cheaper as there is a ferry leaving Portsmouth at 10.30 a.m. which arrives in Spain the next morning at 09.30 a.m. meaning no need for hotels just one night on the boat and the drive down to Periana.

On balance: the ferry saves time, can be cheaper (particularly if you book a reclining seat rather than a cabin!) and much more relaxing start or finish to your holiday.  I particularly like the booking website for Brittany Ferries because you can go online and change your route, timings, accommodation etc. at any time before travelling without cost penalties.  Makes a change after the cheapie airlines rip-off the customer policies.

Any minus points? Not really but remember the Bay of Biscay can be lumpy in winter J

 

www.brittany-ferries.co.uk/

www.eurotunnel.com/

The Rain in Spain falls mainly in Periana!

So I think Eliza Doolittle was mistaken as we are certainly not on the plains of Spain.

Last weekend Periana experienced the most rain for years with over 6 inches falling in a couple of days. In one period of four hours a quarter of the annual rainfall came down. More like a waterfall than rain and there was lots of damage to roads and low lying properties.

Fortunately despite the access road to Cantueso being unmade we escaped reasonably well and the main problem for the village was the blocking of the main road. As you can see from the photos there were rock falls and mudslides near the newly constructed “Mirador” which is on the left as you approach the village.

You can see a graph of the lake levels here. and then select La Vinuela from the drop down box. The line going almost vertically is the current level and is a good indication of the speed with which the water levels rose. Another interesting weather source is one we have mentioned before run by local man Harry Happe. His site www.malagaweather.com is one of only two in Spain that does manual forecasting rather than computer predictions. His site is a mine of weather information and even has links to a tracking chart that shows live flight arrivals to Malaga airport. And when you get bored with aeroplanes you can also see a similar chart tracking ship movements along the coast.

Final note for those of you, who like me work in “old money”, where the Spanish sites predict rainfall in litres per square meter this equals 1 millimetre. Therefore 25 l per sq/m = 1 inch.

All photos by kind permission of the Periana blog http://www.perianaypedanias.com/

You Can’t Miss Us

 

An Gas Petrol Station at Puente don Manuel

Never shy to extol the virtues of Restaurante Cantueso and the view we have just secured a premier advertising site at our local garage near lake Vinuela. It is the only petrol station for miles around so we know that it will be seen by lots of people as they leave, and we just hope they keep driving up to Periana to see us.

Some People Never Learn!

 

February Sunset over Lake Viñuela

We should know better than to tempt fate by writing about the mild weather this winter as Mother nature has a way of reminding us who is in charge, and this last week she sent us very low temperatures and high winds. So much so, that the early blossom on our trees and shrubs now have been blackened by frost and Periana’s town fountain had a great display of icicles.

Periana's Frozen Fountain (courtesy Perianaypedanias.com)

On Mount Maromo there is snow at the very top and this makes for spectacular sunsets and one this week can be seen in our photo above which was captured from the Restaurante Cantueso webcam. During winter months the webcam struggles to cope with the low orbiting sun as it faces South and for much of the day sun shines directly onto the lens. The Malaga Weather website uses our picture alongside their own and it makes an interesting comparison as their camera faces West. You can compare them here.

Birdwatching in Andalusia

Flamingos in Andalusia

Flamingos on Laguna de Fuente de Piedra

Spring is upon us and in some parts of Andalusia seems to be slightly earlier than usual. Here in Periana we already have a good display of Almond blossom and many plants are showing their appreciation of some really warm days. Not only does our climate attract birds but the migratory route across the straights of Gibraltar funnels many species to the area. In Spain there are over 500 recorded species and about 270 of these breed whilst here.

Serious birders will head for the area around Tarifa or Doñana and hope to see Andalusian and Iberian specialities such as: Spanish imperial eagles, Andalucian hemipode, glossy ibis, spoonbills, whiteheaded duck, red knobbed coot etc etc. The list is endless and there is of course the added bonus of travelling in areas of outstanding beauty with impressive cultural and historic heritage. The sweeping plains, salty marshes, evergreen forests, wild olive trees, oaks and firs together with unusual flora and fauna ensure a steady stream of visitors. (Both feathered and plain varieties).

Eagles are just one of hundreds of migratory birds seen in Andalusia

The main crossing point is Tarifa just 14km wide which doesn’t seem much even for small birds such as swallows which in any event migrate thousands of miles. However 15% of the birds attempting the crossing perish each year and this has a knock-on effect for other countries further down the migratory route. In any year you may see some of the following species using this highway: Cuckoos, black storks, white storks, red kites, ospreys, honey buzzards, hen harriers, snipe, oystercatchers, avocets, puffins, bee-eaters, gulls, wheatears and many many more.

The best time for birdwatching is before the heat of summer and many visitors like to combine walking with birdwatching and photography. The hills and mountain ranges around Cantueso in Periana is ideal walking country, with walks of every degree of difficulty, from a family amble to more serious assault courses up Mount Maroma.

Last February we hosted over three thousand flamingos on Lake Viñuela just below us, they were no doubt en route to join their friends on Laguna de Fuente de Piedra a little further north. This famous lagoon is about an hours drive away on the A45 near Antequera and has the largest breeding colony of great flamingos in Europe. Eight to 12,000 pairs and many other species such as: gull billed tern, slender billed gull, kentish plover and montagu’s harrier all breed here. Best to visit before June as the water tends to dry up in the heat of summer.

Spain is one of the best countries in Europe for birdwatching

Please also see our website section on walking, photography and birdwatching.

Websites and books for further reading:

http://www.siren.org.uk

http://www.andaluciabirdsociety.org

“Birdwatching on Spain’s Southern Coast” by John R. Butler

El Acebuchal a Little Piece of History near Periana

There are many stories told about this hamlet, mostly apocryphal, and all involving terrible deeds during the civil war.  Some will tell you, the inhabitants were rounded up and shot or that they were involved with feeding the bandits in the surrounding hills and because of this the roofs of their houses were removed to prevent anyone living there.

The lower part of the hamlet El Acebuchal

The fight against the bandits went on for many years and to avoid the residents being able to provide shelter or sustenance they were put under much pressure by the Guardia Civil. They were in fact finally forced out by a decree which only allowed them to be there during the daytime.  This meant living in a nearby village such as Frigiliana and walking to and from El Acebuchal every day and as there was no motorised transport back then, totally impracticable.  All the inhabitants finally left in 1949 and the cottages quickly became derelict and in many cases roofless. Spanish people in recent years have called the hamlet “Pueblo el Fantasmas” or village of ghosts, due to the 50 or so years that it was deserted and derelict.

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