Bad News for Train-spotters at Cantueso in Periana

Imagine the scene, a Thomas the Tank Engine locomotive and rolling stock that would have looked at home in an American western, rolling through the hills of Periana surrounded by billowing white clouds of steam.  In the last century this was a common sight as there was a narrow gauge railway linking Vélez Málaga, Periana and Ventas de Zafarraya.  It surprises visitors to Cantueso that the unmade road as you approach the complex is in fact the old railway track.

Thomas the Tank Engine Spanish Style

In about 1905 just after Málaga had installed electric trams and the need for more sophisticated transport increased, The Suburban Railway Company was set up, funded with 4 million Pesetas from the Bank of Antwerp in Belgium.  The company received various concessions to build and run lines from Málaga and along the coast.  The grand scheme envisaged a network linking Málaga with cities such as Granada, Seville, Almeria and Gibraltar.  The line from Málaga to Vélez was routed close to the sea and is said to have been a wonderfully scenic journey which, after Almayate, continued through agricultural scenery dominated by sugar cane.  Like the railway we have sadly lost the sugar cane plantations, more of which we will write in a future blog.

Embankment near Periana

The Vélez to Periana line was started in 1911 and opened in 1914 less than two months before the outbreak of the First World War.  Work was halted and the line was only completed in 1921.  The line which was 31 km long had a planned extension from Zafarraya to Alhama but due to the poor economic climate was never built.

The route particularly the stretch from Periana to Ventas de Zafarraya had some serious inclines and Swiss engineers were involved in the design of a rack system to enable the trains to climb to 1000m above sea level.  This part of the route was truly alpine, often encountering seriously bad weather, and it is a tribute to those early engineers that the route never in forty years of service encountered any serious accidents.  At its peak over 500 people were employed on the railway and there were stations at Vélez Málaga, Periana, Ventas de Zafarraya with halts at Trapiche, La Viñuela and Matanza.

Full Speed on the Flat Sections

The demise of this railway and many others like it has been put down to several factors, both economic and social.  After the civil war (1936-1939) and the Second World War, the railway was in much demand carrying loads of sugar cane and other crops to and from the coast, but slowly the introduction of cars and buses lead to a loss of passengers and freight.  Then came the increase in tourism, with a concomitant migration of people from the villages to the coast, and the need to fund many projects along the Costa del Sol, led to a lack of capital spending on the railway.  Eventually what should have been a franchise until 2015, was wound up by Royal Decree in 1959.  The railway closed the next year and the tracks were removed.  After less than fifty years, a form of transport that had replaced the mule trains of old was itself displaced by “progress.”  As fuel costs make travel ever more expensive one can only imagine what could now be made of a scenic railway passing through some of the most attractive landscapes in Spain.

Livestock, Passengers and Goods all in a day's work

As mentioned above, the old track is now the access road to Cantueso Cottages and Restaurante Cantueso.  As you leave Periana and turn right onto the unmade road, the building with a yellow wall on the left is the old station. It is now used occasionally in summer as a boarding school.  In the other direction the track also provides a spectacular walk from Periana to Ventas de Zafarraya, a walk of some 11 miles.

Just before you turn into the drive at Cantueso the old railway track carries on and after a mile comes out onto the Periana-Puente don Manuel road just below the Perimetal factory. Not to be driven in winter after heavy rain!

At Cantueso we have a guide available for the Ventas de Zafarraya walk with maps directions and photos.

See also our “Things to do section.”

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